Missouri FFA and Agriculture Education | Blog
Latest news and reflections by Missouri FFA officers.
missouri ffa, national ffa organization, agriculture, scholarships, leadership, department of elementary and secondary education, dese, horticulture, floriculture, agronomy, livestock
12044
blog,paged,paged-3,edgt-core-1.0,tribe-no-js,tribe-bar-is-disabled,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,,has_general_padding,hudson child-child-ver-1.0.0,hudson-ver-1.6, vertical_menu_with_scroll,smooth_scroll,transparent_content,overlapping_content,grid_1300,blog_installed,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive
 

Lift To Rise

Regan Ragsdale

Regan Ragsdale – Secretary

“We rise by lifting others.” – Robert Ingersoll

 

There is nothing more fulfilling in life than when we lift others up through service.

 

The Missouri State Fair is here – finally! Many describe these booming 10 days in Sedalia, Missouri, as the best times of the year.

 

So many of you have been working all year with your livestock, watering your plants and crops (despite the drought), and gearing up to make incredible memories with your family and friends. I can’t imagine the amount of pride that must be beaming from your soul – whether you receive a ribbon or not.

 

Many members have traveled to the fair to exhibit. In addition to many of you who are exhibiting at the state fair, 650 other FFA members signed up for Food Insecurity Day on Tuesday, Aug. 14. Missouri FFA members from across the Show-Me state will pack 100,000 meals to be distributed between the six Food Banks in the Feeding Missouri Network.

 

The Missouri State Fair, Missouri Department of Agriculture, Missouri Farmers Care, Missouri FFA and many others will work diligently to ensure that countless members could come together to make a huge difference in the lives of those who are food insecure.

 

Consider this fact: 1 in 5 kids in the state of Missouri is food insecure. Missouri FFA members – you have LIFTED others by having a servant’s heart. I know that if you continue to embrace the last line of our FFA motto, “living to serve,” you will RISE.

 

Read More

We’re Going to the Fair

Dillon Reinitz

Dillon Reinitz – VP

There is nothing like the thrill of attending the Missouri State Fair! I remember when I was younger, my parents would say, “Dillon, load up. We’re going to the fair.” I immediately ran to the truck and prepared for the long drive to Sedalia. I wasn’t sure if it was the rides or the livestock barns that made me more excited. I remember seeing how excited the exhibitors in the show ring were when they led their animals into the ring. I couldn’t wait until I had the opportunity to be an exhibitor at the Missouri State Fair.

 

When my FFA advisor asked me my freshman year of high school if I wanted to exhibit at the state fair, I couldn’t help but say yes. I took bacon, peppers, zucchini and many other vegetables to show in the FFA building. Although it was so much fun, I also remember how much work it took to complete the registration as well as prepare my items for competition while preparing for the upcoming school year.

 

FFA members, what an exciting time for all of us! As we prepare for this year’s Missouri State Fair, we can’t forget to focus on the other upcoming events that await us with the start of a new school year. Good luck to all exhibitors at the fair, and have a great year in FFA!

 

Read More

The Sweet Sound of Success

Andi Montgomery

Andi Montgomery – VP

Flip, flip, flip go the records as I sort through hundreds of them to find the perfect oldie I had been dreaming about. Pause. I pull the record out slowly, just to find it is warped. Plunk. Back into the file it goes. Flip, flip, flip. Time seems to continue forever, until finally I find it.

You might be wondering what a tedious day of record hunting could do with FFA.

To get the best quality of sound from a record, you must do a few certain steps, kind of like FFA.

First, you must take the beauty out of the cover, check for scratches and place it on the turn table.

In FFA, this looks like learning your skills and checking for obstacles.

Preparations might look like early contest team practices, or planning activities for chapter members.

Then, you must take the needle off the rest and gently place it on the outside of the disc.

Take action, and carefully keep track of your recordsso that you can get the most out of what you are producing. I know SAE’s can be hard to keep track of in the summer, but I promise if you diligently stick to it, it will pay off.

Finally, it’s time to select the right speed.

Find your tempo. This could look different for every FFA member — slow and steady or jumping in to get your feet wet in brand new ideas and activities. It is important to find the right pace for you, so that you will not get burned out or bored.

FFA members, as events keep flipping by, my challenge to you is to work on these steps, so you might hear the sweet sounds of success in your future!

 

Read More

Skills to Last a Lifetime

Alumni Spotlight: Catching up with Doug Kueker

By Alison Bos-Lovins

Doug Kueker, Missouri FFA Alumnus

What has FFA taught you?

 

For alumnus Doug Kueker, his time in the National FFA Organization provided him with life lessons, skills and opportunities he uses every day in his career.

 

“My experience in the classroom, laboratory and through FFA helped me develop the skills and character traits everyone needs to be successful – communication, being a team player, positively influencing others, time management, responsibility and more,” Kueker said.

 

Kueker grew up on a small cow-calf and row crop farm in Sweet Springs, Missouri. He was very active in his FFA chapter, served as Missouri FFA President and was later selected as a National FFA Officer.

 

Serving as a state and national officer taught Kueker to respect the value of diversity and to seek to understand differences before jumping to conclusions. He was beyond honored to be selected by his peers to represent other FFA members at the state and national levels.

 

“Both of these humbling experiences broadened my perspective about the diversity of the agriculture, food, and natural resource industry in Missouri, as well as across the U.S.,” he explained.

 

Kueker’s journey as a state and national officer led him to experiences that he will never forget. His favorite experience as a state officer was traveling the state to Greenhand leadership conferences with his fellow state officers. He enjoyed working with young FFA members and helping them set goals for their career and leadership development. Kueker recalls hearing progress from students he worked with a few years later, which he said was a very rewarding feeling.

 

His experience as a national officer was also an inspiring venture for Kueker. He was humbled to represent members on a national level and see the passion members had for FFA.

 

“Traveling to different chapters across the state of South Dakota during FFA Week was one of my favorite experiences as a national officer,” Kueker explained. “Experiencing the enthusiasm FFA members have for the organization and for the future of agriculture firsthand was inspiring.”

 

Kueker admits that being a state and national officer was hard work. It required passion and drive. He explained that to earn the right to represent other FFA members in this capacity, one should be prepared to spend time investing in building the knowledge and skills it takes to lead effectively.

 

“Take time to reflect on what you have gained from FFA and why you feel it is important to encourage other FFA members to pursue their own development through the organization,” he said.

 

In addition to his FFA honors, Kueker received his agricultural education degree from the University of Missouri. After graduation, he worked for the National FFA Organization, where he created curriculum for national student conferences such as the Washington Leadership Conference. Additionally, he generated curriculum for professional development experiences for agricultural teachers. Kueker obtained a master’s degree in education from Purdue University and recently completed his PhD in Information Science and Learning Technologies from the University of Missouri.

 

Through his accomplishments, Kueker credits the FFA organization for shaping his future. Plus, he said FFA taught him that hard work and perseverance pay off.

 

“FFA helped me set goals and explore and discover my passions and talents,” Kueker said.

 

He has a passion for learning new things and developing others. An entrepreneur, Kueker took his passion and turned it into a successful business. His company, Vivayic, designs effective learning programs and educational materials that equip individuals with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to be successful. It offers services such as learning strategy and analysis; curriculum and program design; education program evaluation; and e-learning and content delivery.

 

“Simply put, my company Vivayic helps build others’ capacity to do good in the world,” Kueker said. “A majority of our work is with organizations who are striving to ensure a safe and sustainable food supply to feed the world, as well as groups and organizations who are working to make the K-16 education system more relevant and effective.”

 

Kueker continues to support the FFA organization today. He volunteers to help Missouri FFA organize and conduct national officer candidate interviews each year. He also works with FFA members at HYMAX academy and with area officers at the Area Officer Institute at Camp Rising Sun each summer. Plus, he and his wife, Emily, enjoy working with members of local chapters to help them prepare for contests and other FFA events.

 

Kueker advises FFA members to step outside their comfort zones. He encourages members to do that contest they do not think they can do. Additionally, he said FFA members should sign up to be on a committee to organize a chapter FFA event. He also charges members to interact with others at conventions or camps and bring back new ideas to their chapter.

 

“You’ll never know how much you are capable of until you step out of your comfort zone,” Kueker said.

Read More

They Make a Difference

Ag Teachers share passion for the industry — and their students

By Alison Bos-Lovins

Looking for a career in agriculture where you can make a difference in the lives of others? As the industry faces a national shortage of agricultural educators, those in the field share why they teach ag and why they want to see students succeed.

 

Agricultural education teachers share a common passion — to teach students about the importance of agriculture and see their students succeed.

 

Even though some instructors have years of experience and others are just starting their careers, agricultural educators understand their importance. They embrace the reality of a nationwide shortage of agricultural educators and know that more people need to consider agricultural education as a career.

 

Jarred Sayre, agricultural education instructor at Milan High School, has been teaching for 22 years. Sayre wants to instill hard work, dedication, and a passion for agriculture in his students.

 

“Agriculture education is so important because as a society we are growing further away from the farm,” Sayre said. “We live in a society that does not understand where our food comes from, the steps it takes to get it to the store, and the hard work put in by all facets of agriculture.”

 

Seeing his students succeed is one of the most rewarding aspects of Sayre’s job.

 

Another veteran teacher, Jason Dieckhoff, has been teaching at the Cass Career Center in Harrisonville for 15 years. He also hopes to instill the importance of agriculture in his students and teach skills needed in today’s workforce. Dieckhoff helps develop youth into productive and active participants in the future of the industry by implementing a well-balanced program for students to receive the full agricultural education experience.

 

“We need agriculture education so the future in our industry not only has the necessary set of skills and knowledge but also has the same set of core beliefs — a faith in the future of agriculture born not of words but of deeds,” he said.

 

Despite the pleasure both Sayre and Dieckhoff find in working with students, being an agricultural education instructor often is challenging. According to Sayre, one the biggest hurdles of his job is working with students who are not as motivated by success. Dieckhoff has found that the most challenging part of his job is adapting his teaching methods to fit interests of students today.

 

“Young teachers can relate better to high school students and are used to the technology and social media current students are using, “Dieckhoff said.

 

Emily Reed, an agriculture education instructor at Saline County Career Center, and Rylyn Small, who teaches agriculture at East Prairie High School, are early in their agricultural education careers. Their advisors and their FFA experiences helped aid in their decision to become agriculture teachers.

 

“My goal as a teacher is to allow all students to feel and find their place in the agriculture classroom,” Small said. “I have a passion for student success.”

 

Reed and Small know agriculture education is important and needed. They hope to instill a passion for agriculture and teach students how to be informed.

 

“With the world population continuing to climb, it is very important to have people who are ready to educate those who may not understand agricultural topics,” Reed explained.

 

Despite the importance of agricultural education, the nationwide shortage has teachers concerned. Dieckhoff, Sayre, Small, and Reed know the extensive hours, demands, stress, and salary compared to other agricultural jobs are factors that likely affect the shortage.

 

“We put in several hours above and beyond what is required of us,” Sayre stated.

 

Dieckhoff said, “To teach today, you truly have to possess a passion for youth. If you do not, you will not last long or be very happy.”

 

According to Reed, she knows how some teachers can suffer from burnout. Plus, there are more teachers retiring than young professionals graduating with degrees to fill positions.

 

Small encourages FFA members to consider a career in the field as he said it is one of the most rewarding jobs to have. Plus, he knows agricultural education is a necessity.

 

“We need FFA members that have a passion for the industry, FFA and students,” Small explained. “Be prepared to stress, have late nights and early mornings and sometimes no sleep. But also be prepared to impact students and watch students grow into strong leaders in the agriculture industry.”

 

Read More

Most American Holiday

McKenzie Loftis

McKenzie Loftis – VP

At FFA Camp there weren’t any fireworks exploding on the 4th of July. Still, I saw plenty of members explode into leadership. It looked different for each individual. One young lady decided she is going to audition for National FFA Chorus. She sure can make you feel America the Beautiful deep in your soul! At the same time she was working towards that goal, other kids were learning what it takes to be a servant leader in their chapter. Others were learning about careers in agriculture, too. Each and every one of these members are headed for a long road to meeting their goals. The unique goals they have set for themselves fit their personality and skill set. We each have a place we belong in this organization and the world. If we can key in on our personal path to success we will begin to see others that are walking alongside us. The partnerships we discover on these paths will last so much longer than forced friendships or “small talk” conversations. As you lead in your respective areas, keep pressing forward along side each other. Pursue your dreams whole-heartedly. Explode forward into your role of leadership.

 

Read More

Do Your Best Today

Regan Ragsdale, Secretary 2018-19

Regan Ragsdale – Secretary

“The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today.” – H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

 

Sometimes it is hard to be our best – especially in the summer time.

 

It is easy to fall in love with the lull of summer. Easy to sleep in, stay up late, have days on the couch or by the pool, indulge in an insane amount of popsicles and watch the days go by. There is nothing wrong with days like this. In fact, I’m not sure I could survive without these kinds of days. However, these are few and far between if I want the be the best that I can possibly be.

 

Missouri FFA members – you can be your absolute best this summer. Many of you have traveled to FFA Camp at Camp Rising Sun with your goal to become a better leader. Washington Leadership Conference, in our nation’s capital, has stolen hundreds of FFA member’s servant hearts. In preparation for the Missouri State Fair, members are growing cucumbers, cattle and cacti from all parts of the state.

 

The success from these opportunities will come by giving your all and being YOUR best. If you choose not to waste a single second of the 86,400 seconds in each day, then you will be your absolute best.

 

I challenge you to give your all every day this summer and be fearless in the pursuit of what sets your soul on fire.

Read More

Ends Are Just The Beginning

Adriene Aubuchon, VP 2018-19

Adriene Aubuchon – VP

This time of the year seems it seems like everything is coming to an end. Convention, banquets and contest season have all been winding down, and it’s easy to be swept up into the lull of doing nothing. If you’re a freshman, you’re just completing your first year in FFA, and if you’re a senior, you’re wrapping up four amazing years in an organization that’s likely brought many memorable moments.

Have you ever heard the saying “When one door closes, another one opens”? This perfectly sums up these four years you’ve spent in FFA. This chapter might be closing, but something new is on the horizon. Change is good. We will carry the friendships, memories and life lessons with us throughout our whole lives. You might be hanging up the blue jacket, but you will never be done with FFA because it changes your life. And when something impacts you this much, it sticks with you forever.

Just because school is out and summer vacation is here doesn’t mean that we have to stop being involved in FFA for a few months. Camp, Helping Youth Prepare for Excellence (HYPE) Academy, Helping Youth Maximize their Agricultural eXperience (HYMAX) and county and state fairs are adventures full of memories just waiting for us.

Ends are just the beginning of new opportunities. Enjoy the ride.

Read More

Enjoy Your Present

Madison Bader, VP 2018-19

Madison Bader – VP

One of my favorite times of the year is spring. While it is probably the busiest time, with planting, conventions, contests and end-of-the-school-year events, it is full of so much energy and happiness.

At the same time, it can be stressful. You want to be done with school and be outside, but you are stuck doing tasks that seem boring and tedious. I assure you, I am the same way. By the time it gets warm outside with the flowers growing and the sun shining, I would rather be outside and soaking up the rays than doing paperwork.

 

Looking back, I wish I spent more time focusing on everything I did in FFA instead of wishing I was doing something else. Dont get me wrong; I loved planning and putting together banquets and studying for career development events, I just wished I spent more time living in the moment rather than taking for granted my time in this organization.

I would do anything to have another year in my home chapter with my friends I have been with since grade school, but God has bigger plans for me. In order to accomplish those plans, we all have to move out of our comfort zones and into the world for which FFA has prepared us.

 

So to all of you wishing this year was over and it was summer vacation, take a deep breath and know these times go more quickly than you think. Someday you will miss filling out those applications and doing those tedious tasks. We all have big things in store for us, but we always need to appreciate and acknowledge what got us there in the first place.

Read More

Remembering Your Roots

Madelyn Derks, VP 2018-19

Madelyn Derks – VP

“Shhhhh!” a FFA member whispered as our advisor rounded the corner of his garage and… SPLAT! His face met the cool whip covered plate my officer team prepared. Not waiting for the retaliation that was sure to occur, we took off running. Every year, my advisor hosts our annual FFA end-of-the-summer gathering. It is a time for leaving seniors to share memories with incoming freshman. More importantly, it is a time to encourage new members for the upcoming year and reflect on the past with retiring members.

 

Summer is here and with that warm Missouri climate, comes exciting adventures of livestock shows, camps and working with our Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs). As we begin our journey to Camp Rising Sun or any FFA event, we should remember our roots.

 

Our roots are the lessons and skills that we have fine-tuned from previous experiences and events. New contests and challenges bring the willingness to open our minds to new ideas, skills and lessons. As we improve ourselves with shining new skills, it is when we combine them with what we have already learned that we become amazing. When we take our experiences from previous events and build upon them with new lessons, we can completely rejuvenate ourselves for tomorrow.

 

Our roots are the base to what grows into a flowering and prospering plant. FFA members, I encourage you to remember your roots as you take on new experiences and learn new lessons this year!

Read More

Hold the Gate

Audrey Martin, VP 2018-19

Audrey Martin – VP

Fair season is upon us and with that, comes the hectic nature of the fair. Many of you will be exhibiting the animals or projects that you have spent countless hours taking care of.

 

When you get to the fair with your animals or project, you may find yourself a little more stressed than normal. Maybe you are behind schedule, or your animal got out of its pen last night, or you are tired of all the people in the barn that seem to be in each other’s way.

 

In those stressful moments, remember that you are an FFA member. You will be around many younger kids who have far less experience than you, and I challenge you to put them first. 4-H kids are looking up to the FFA members and are learning from you.

 

FFA members, you will have far less trouble unloading your pigs or washing your calf than the younger kids, so let them go first. Hold the gate open for them when they are struggling and help show them what it means to be a FFA member.

 

You set an example for the younger kids of how one should act in and out of the show ring. Remember that we represent the FFA Organization whether or not we are wearing our jackets. Therefore we need to all do our best to help everyone have a positive experience at the fair.

 

Read More

Missouri Agriculture Bands Together to Combat Childhood Hunger

Drive to Feed Kids Logo
JEFFERSON CITY, MO. – The 2018 Drive to Feed Kids officially kicks off today. The goal for this collaboration is to raise funds to provide food for hungry Missouri children, pack 100,000 nutritious, kid-friendly meals at the Missouri State Fair and to stand in the gap for the Missouri children who face food insecurity.

 

In 2017, Missouri Farmers Care (MFC) launched Drive to Feed Kids to combat childhood food insecurity and showcase Missouri agriculture. The inaugural Drive raised nearly $150,000 for Feeding Missouri, the coalition of Missouri’s six regional food banks, provided 52,000 nutritious meals and 9,000 pounds of food donations to Missouri children who face hunger on a regular basis.

 

According to the latest data from Feeding America’s “Map the Meal Gap”, there are more than 240,000 children in Missouri who don’t know where their next meal will come from. Missouri counties with the highest rates of food insecurity are disproportionately rural, where one out of every three children faces food insecurity.

 

“We have seen hunger and food insecurity increase in rural areas over the past decade,”said Alan Wessler, D.V.M., MFC chairman. “Some things are out of our control. We can’t control the economy. We can’t create rapid recoveries for rural communities who have suffered economic setbacks. However, we can join together as an agricultural community to do what agriculture does best-feed people. That’s why Missouri Farmers Care, with its more than 45 member organizations, is leading the way with Drive to Feed Kids.”

 

Events of the 2018 Drive to Feed Kids will take place on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, in conjunction with the Missouri FFA’s Food Insecurity Day when hundreds of FFA members from across Missouri will work side by side to package 100,000 meals. The Drive will culminate on Saturday, Aug. 18, with a check presentation to Feeding Missouri during the Cole Swindell/Raelynn concert at the Fair.

Missouri Farmers Care encourages companies and individuals to participate in the Drive to Feed Kids by becoming a sponsor. If you would like to partner with MFC to benefit the Drive to Feed Kids, contact Ashley McCarty, MFC executive director, at ashley@mofarmerscare.com. Individual donations can be directed to http://mofarmerscare.com/drive. All proceeds will be dedicated to Feeding Missouri network food banks who work daily to alleviate against childhood hunger.

To learn more about Drive to Feed Kids, visit www.mofarmerscare.com/drive.

Read More

Missouri FFA Sponsors Missouri FFA Public Speaking Academy on UCM Campus


Sixty-six FFA members from across the state participated in the Missouri FFA Public Speaking Academy held June 5-7, 2018 on the University of Central Missouri campus.

 

The Missouri FFA, along with Case IH, made it possible for FFA members to benefit from the professional staff at University of Central Missouri.

 

During the three-day event, FFA members used the Internet and other communication technology to develop and refine an effective speech.  Dr. Terry Cunconan, Dr. Wendy Geiger, Dr. Sam Cox, and Dr. Nikki Freeman from the University’s Speech Communication Department conducted the three days of intense learning.  The academy was designed to help FFA members increase their confidence, develop organizational skills, use language effectively, analyze audiences and improve speaking skills by judging themselves honestly and critically — while keeping a positive attitude.  Each student presented his or her speech in competition at the conclusion of the academy.

 

Awards were presented at a banquet held at the Ozark Room of the University Conference Center on Thursday, June 7, 2018.  The banquet included the presentation of certificates of completion to each of the participants and recognition of the winners in each division.  The finalists in each division (Beginners, Intermediate, and Advanced) were presented plaques and a State Public Speaking Pin from the Missouri FFA Association. Case IH was the primary sponsor

for this year’s academy.  The academy was also sponsored by Seitz Fundraising, Harmison’s Hometown Fundraising, University of Central Missouri Communications Department and UCM’s Ag Club, and the Missouri FFA Association.

 

Assisting with the three-day conference were State FFA Officers –Allie Lock, State Vice President of the Carrollton FFA Chapter, Andi Montgomery, State Vice President of the Everton FFA Chapter, Regan Ragsdale State Secretary of the Paris FF

 

A Chapter, and Hannah Viets, State Vice President of the Sweet Springs FFA Chapter.  Jessie Peterson

served as a valuable intern for the event.  The Conference Coordinator for the academy is Marie Davis, Northeast District Supervisor for Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in Missouri’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

The Missouri FFA has 25,375 members representing 343 chapters. The National FFA Organization has more than 653,000 members representing 8,568 local chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

 

The FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education.

Read More

2018 Food Insecurity Day

Drive to Feed Kids LogoMissouri FFA ispulling together details for our second Food Insecurity Day at the Missouri State Fair.

 

First of all, we are pleased to partner with Missouri Farmers Care, Missouri State Fair, The Food Bank of Central & Northeast Missouri, Meals of Hope and Feeding Missouri on this and other events at the MSF this year in regards to Food Insecurity.

 

We plan to pack 100,000 Meals at the Missouri State Fair on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. These meals will stay in Missouri; in fact the goal is to work to get at least 15,000 to 20,000 meals to each of the six food banks located in the state (truly a state effort).  This day is also the Missouri Farmers Care Food Drive Day at the Fair.  Missouri Farmers Care has been gracious enough to again add our sponsorship needs to their efforts as they are working to raise $250,000 for the Backpack program in Missouri.  We have been included in this effort and we need to provide FFA members to assist with various activities during the Fair in return.

 

What does the Food Insecurity Day look like on August 14, 2018?

THERE ARE MODIFICATIONS FROM LAST YEAR.  We heard that an 8 a.m. start was difficult for some chapters to fascillitate, so we are working to adjust our schedule and MSF and MFC are behind us 100 percent. We have scheduled two packing shifts this year.

Here is the TENTATIVE schedule and associated items as of May 15, 2018:

 

8:30 am – Registration for morning volunteers at the Directors Tent on MSF grounds

9:00 am – Welcome – State President

9:05 am – Introduction of Partners (with a few remarks) – MSF, MDA, Food Banks, Sponsors

9:15 am – Scavenger Hunt instructions

9:30 am – FFA Members transported to Lowell Mohler Assembly Hall by trams provided by MSF

9:45 am – Instructions for packing

10:00 am – News Conference with Partners

10:15 am – Begin Packing with first shift

11:30 am — Registration for afternoon volunteers at the Directors Tent on MSF grounds

12:00 noon – Noon Meal in the Directors Tent for BOTH morning volunteers and afternoon volunteers

12:30 pm – Speaker – Diane Sullivan – Advocate for Agriculture and working to end Food Insecurity

1:00 pm – FFA members transported to Lowell Mohler Assembly Hall

1:30 pm – Begin Packing with second shift

3:30 pm – Conclude packing and clean up

By 5:00 pm – turn in scavenger hunt paperwork at FFA Building for a thank you gift for your participation

5:30 pm – Sponsors dinner with speaker Diane Sullivan – Invite only!!

If you are interested in helping, please contact your FFA advisor. Questions may be directed to Keith Dietzschold at keith.dietzschold@dese.mo.gov 

 

Thank you for service to FFA members across the state.

 

Read More

2018 Missouri AgriScience Fair Results

Animal Systems – Division 3
Jacob Toombs – Bolivar

Animal Systems – Division 4
Isabella Kidwell and Dylan Sparks – Troy

Animal Systems – Division 5
Daryin Sharp – Bolivar

Animal Systems – Division 6
Jenna Hahn and Collin Nichols – Troy

Environ Services/NRS – Division 3
Alex Rhode – Boonville

Environ Services/NRS – Division 4
Lexi Vickrey and Megan Hargis – Troy

Environ Services/NRS – Division 5
Isaiah Massey – Troy

Environ Services/NRS – Division 6
Jordan Miller and Tyler Linneman – Carrollton

Food Products – Division 3
Caroline Herigon – Boonville

Food Products – Division 4
Gabi Hall and Gracie Bachtel – Carrollton

Food Products – Division 5
Preston McDowell – Tuscumbia

Food Products – Division 6
Jennifer Austermann and Hersh Patel – Troy

Plant Systems – Division 3
Jacob Love – Troy

Plant Sysems – Division 4
Olivia Conrow and Mason Ray – Boonville

Plant Systems – Divison 5
Addison Burns – Gallatin

Plant Systems – Division 6
Jacob Maclean and Abbegail French – Troy

Power, Structural/Tech – Division 3
Gabe Lorenz – Boonville

Power, Structural/Tech – Division 4
Adam Lester – Boonville

Social Systems – Division 3
Bryanne Knowlton – Troy

Social Systems – Division 4
Briley Gregg and Sally Schmidt – Carrollton

Social Systems – Division 5
Britany Jones – Boonville

Social Systems – Division 6
Allie Lock and Katy Grant – Carrollton

Agriscience Fair 2018 Candid2
Agriscience Fair 2018 Candid3
Agriscience Fair 2018 Candid6
Agriscience Fair 2018 Candid4
Agriscience Fair 2018 Candid5
Read More