Missouri FFA and Agriculture Education | Tips from Missouri’s Top Chapters
missouri ffa association, national ffa association
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Tips from Missouri’s Top Chapters

From planning to creating activities that encourage member and community involvement, both Marshall and Paris FFA Chapters know what it takes to be among National FFA’s top chapters.

 

Both chapters will be recognized for their efforts as Model of Excellence finalists this month at the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Indiana. Marshall is also a premier chapter in the growing leaders category.

 

Paris FFA works to create activities that compliment National FFA’s Model of Excellence component of the National Chapter Award program. Activities such as Bacon Math Fun, Old Timer Barnwarming and Paris FFA Aggie Days are some examples of their events. Advisor Josh Bondy said chapters should find a need, create an activity and ask members what they are passionate about.

 

Plus, community support is key to the chapter’s success. According to advisor Jaelyn Peckman, their community is the backbone of their chapter because of its constant support and guidance.

 

“We are very thankful for our community support, and we realize this support makes new opportunities possible for our chapter,” she said.

 

Marshall FFA Advisor Tyler Burgin recommends chapters put a unique spin on activities already planned. He said doing so adds impact and reaches more people. Plus, both he and advisor Emily Reed said including officers and members in the planning and implementation of chapter activities is key to planning successful chapter activities.

 

“This is a student-led organization, and students take more pride in themselves and the chapter when they have to do something on their own,” Reed said.

 

—Story by Alison Bos-Lovins